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Learn About Us

Learnings from grantmaking practice

Between June 2012 and June 2017, VFFF analysed 206 grant acquittals submitted by grantees.

While undertaking a Strategic Review in the 2017 Financial Year, we revisited these analyses and their ratings, to draw out learnings to strengthen our future work. Essentially, the idea being to understand the characteristics of grants that perform well and those that don’t – in order to inform our application, assessment and decisionmaking processes.

Our Learning from grant performance document presents the following information resulting from this analysis:

  • General learnings from these grants
  • Summary characteristics of higher and lower performing grants

We share this document in the spirit of transparency and as part of our commitment to share our learnings from success and failure. Please note that this document reflects the author’s interpretation of VFFF’s experience of this particular group of grants.

Latest Grants

  • Behavioural Insights Team
    $270,181 to trial, evaluate and roadmap interventions for the Code for Online Decisions & Ethics (CODE) Program.
  • National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy
    $375,000 over three years to employ a Marketing and Fundraising Manager.
  • The Family Centre
    $319,606 over three years for It Takes a Town, an initiative focused on creating opportunities and environments for children and their families to thrive.
  • Walter and Eliza Hall Supplementary Trust
    $2,500,000 over five years for the Small Grants Program, responding to the needs of people in necessitous circumstances.
  • Jesuit Refugee Service
    $50,000 towards the Empowered to Work project, an employment training program for people seeking asylum to facilitate their participation in the Australian labour market.
  • Public Interest Advocacy Centre
    $50,000 towards the Indigenous Child Protection project, an initiative to reduce the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children entering the out-of-home care system.